Ludmila Kovalthouk

“Intellect” project page: http://intellect.pma.fpm.kpi.ua/profile/klo5

When and where were you born?

17/06/1956, Novoselenginsk, Russia.

What school did you graduate from?

School 197, Kyiv.

What university did you graduate from and with what major?

Taras Shevchenko State University of Kyiv, the Faculty of Cybernetics.

How long have you been teaching at KPI?

Since 1992.

What courses do you teach?

“Databases and Information Systems,” “Application Software.”

How do you spend your pastime, what hobbies have you got?

Teaching Mathematics in French.

If the world was threatened to lose all the books, which one would you try to rescue?

“Eugene Onegin” by Alexander Pushkin, stories by Ihara Saikaku.

If you caught a goldfish, what wishes would you make?

Keeping sane, supporting zest for life, gaining new pleasant emotions.

“It is never too late to learn.” What have you learnt/discovered recently?

I keep up the technological progress, with interest but reluctantly. Also I willingly adopt any new knowledge from the students.

What did you want to become when you were a child?

It was always interesting to learn Mathematics and Foreign Languages. And these interests have been successfully realized.

What was your student life like?

There was very strong distance between professors and students. Since computers were not readily available, programming was exercised mainly on paper. On the whole, then life was interesting and eventful. Our motto was “Pressing for A and B by all means.”

Do you have favorites among students you teach?

Of course, I do. But requirements to them are naturally higher. “Unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required.“

Do you regret expelling students?

I’m not sorry for the slackers. It is possible to spare a failed student who has made an attempt to do something. I deeply dislike lies and cruelly punish for them.

Do you agree with the statement that earlier students were better than nowadays? Is it true that the quality of school education is steadily going down?

“O tempora! O mores!” The older generation has been complaining about the young for ages. The level of education is dropping as the level of demands on students is decreasing.